Seismic Interferometry for Exploration and Production

by Deyan Draganov and Kees Wapenaar

Duration: Two days

Intended Audience: Entry Level

Prerequisites (Knowledge/Experience/Education Required): This course is intended for a broad audience. A basic understanding of wave-equation theory is required.

Course Outline:
Seismic interferometry is the process of obtaining new seismic recordings at locations of receivers from correlation, convolution or deconvolution of existing recordings at these receivers. The retrieved new data represent recordings as if from a virtual source at the position of one of the receiver locations. For the retrieval, one can make use of responses to active man-made sources (like dynamite, seismic vibrators or CSEM), but also of ambient noise.

In this course, we will present the generalized theory of seismic interferometry. We will review the relations for interferometry by correlation, convolution and deconvolution. Each of these methods has its pros and cons for specific field applications. Using numerical, laboratory and field data, we will review applications of the different methods for exploration, reservoir characterization and monitoring. We will discuss what can be expected of each of the methods in the light of their limitations (theoretical or practical). We will also present processing techniques that can be used to improve the interferometric results.

This course is intended for a broad audience. A basic understanding of wave-equation theory is required.

Learner Outcomes:

  • Derive interferometric relations
  • Choose interferometric methods for specific applications
  • Plan interferometric applications for exploration and production
  • Process interferometric data.

Instructor Biographies:
Deyan Draganov
Kees Wapenaar